Quality and Outcomes

Hospital Operating Room Overhaul Lifts Efficiency and Patient Satisfaction

Cheryl L. Serra

by Cheryl L. Serra Satisfied patients are a powerful marketing tool for health care organizations, as one hospital learned when it overhauled the scheduling and management of its operating rooms (ORs). The efforts led to increased efficiency and patient satisfaction and helped boost profitability. Dr. Adam Blomberg, Vice Chief of Anesthesiology and Co-Medical Director of Read More

Market for Bariatric Services Grows as Patient BMIs Increase

Cheryl Haas

by Cheryl Haas Whether the cause is super-sized portions, pedestrian-unfriendly suburbs, or too many hours in front of the computer (or some combination of the above), Americans are becoming bigger at an alarming rate. The growing numbers of morbidly obese adults and children are fueling an increase in weight-loss surgery and medical weight-loss management services Read More

High Reliability Helps Connecticut Hospital Reduce Safety Errors by 80 Percent

Jane Weber Brubaker

by Jane Weber Brubaker In October, a nurse who had extensive contact with Thomas Eric Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas became infected with Ebola. Although the worker had worn protective gear, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed the infection was caused by a “breach in safety protocol.” (AP) Shortly thereafter, a second Read More

Improved Patient Flow in Hospitals: How to Break Through the Bottlenecks

by Sandra Marchetti Backups and delays are a common, but always unwelcome, part of the health care process. Patient flow problems are a source of anxiety and long waits for patients, as well as frustration and inefficiency for providers. According to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, many U.S. hospitals have problems with achieving optimal patient Read More

Does Employee Engagement Matter?

by Cynthia King, PhD, and Daniel King, MS No longer is it enough to have satisfied employees who just want to “get by.” Instead, it is essential that hospitals and health systems cultivate a working environment that promotes and sustains highly engaged employees who are loyal to their organization. Highly engaged individuals are not only Read More

Nursing as a Strategic Differentiator: Think Anew

by Gloria Sanchez-Rico, RN, BSN, MBA, NEA-BC Old stereotypes die hard, and nowhere is this more true than when it comes to nursing. For while nurses continue to provide exceptional bedside care and remain the single greatest contributor to a good or bad patient experience, anyone who thinks their contribution ends there should think again. Read More

Mobile Clinics: A Proactive Public Health Strategy

by Jared Kebbell Mobile health clinics are becoming an increasingly important part of the American health care system. They represent a move toward a more proactive public health strategy, seeking to bring care to those in need and the uninsured rather than waiting for them to seek it themselves in expensive emergency rooms. To many Read More

The Importance of Addressing Culture When Merging Different Entities

by Sheryl S. Jackson Keep Focus on Patient-Centric Care and Take Time to Engage Everyone in the Process Increasing financial and competitive pressures within the health care industry have spurred hospital acquisition of other health care providers – physician practices, urgent care centers, and imaging centers. While the reasons for acquiring other entities varies from Read More

Fast Takes: News & Trend Lines, May 2014

Brands still struggle with Twitter as a marketing tool According to a survey conducted in March by Social Media Marketing University, 45 percent of brands re­port that measuring results and ascertaining an ROI is the biggest challenge when using Twitter for marketing. Other significant challenges are building an audience (42 percent), engagement (37 percent), learning Read More

For This Virginia Hospital, Safety Is on the Daily Agenda

Nancy Vessell profile pic

by Nancy Vessell If the marketing director of the 445-bed Winchester (VA) Medical Center needs to track down the hospital’s busy medical directors, he knows where he can find them between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. each day. It’s a sure bet they will be in the Daily Safety Call. So ingrained is this daily Read More

Hospital Rewards Patients Who Take Care of Themselves

Diane Atwood

by Diane Atwood A man walks out of his doctor’s office with prescriptions to lower his blood pressure and choles­terol. He has been told that if he doesn’t lose at least 25 pounds, stop smoking, and start exercising, he’ll be at great risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. The odds of the man accomplishing Read More

Dedicated Emergency Departments Target Expectant Moms

Nancy Vessell profile pic

by Nancy Vessell Obstetric emergency departments staffed 24/7 by obstetricians/gynecologists are popping up around the country, handling obstetric triage and emergent situations. Two of the newest – and the first in New Jersey – are Christ Hospital in Jersey City and Hoboken University Medical Center. Their parent corporation, CarePoint Health, says the OB EDs that Read More

Non-Clinical Care Guides Offer Positive Approach to Patient Care

Diane Atwood

by Diane Atwood Richard Adair, MD, has been an internist for about 40 years. He is currently employed by Allina Health, a large not-for-profit network of hospitals and clinics in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. As is the case for health care providers across the coun­try, Adair gets to spend, on average, about 20 minutes with Read More

Big Data, Little Information?

by Joyce Miller, Jaren Wilson, and Beverly Schulman In recent years, the volume and variety of health care data has grown exponen­tially to the point that the term “big data” has be­come part of our vocabu­lary. Big data refers to data sets so large and complex that they are difficult to process. In short, big Read More

Fast Takes: News & Trend Lines, October 2013

Wide disparities in access and quality by state Access to affordable health care and the quality of care provided vary greatly for low-income people ($47,000 a year for a family of four) based on the state in which they live, according to a new report from the Commonwealth Fund. Geographic differences also extend to people Read More